Our human bodies are designed to be in motion rather than sitting for long periods during the day. Being sedentary for extended periods of the day can be bad for your health and is seen to increase the risk of health-related problems. Height Adjustable Desking (sometimes referred to as Sit-Stand Desks) not only allows you to stand comfortably whilst working but also allows you to adjust your worksurface to your preferred level whilst seated. Sit-Stand Desking have many health benefits and is seen to increase worker mood and productivity.

Standing Lowers the Risk of Weight Gain

Sitting for long periods of the day can increase the risk of weight gain, due to being sedentary throughout the day does not burn as many calories as opposed to standing at your desk. Obviously, exercise is the most effective way to burn calories, however choosing to stand instead of being seated at work can be as equally beneficial and burn calories.

Standing Can Reduce Back Pain

Back pain is one of the biggest causes of workplace absences in Europe. There have been several studies to see whether height adjustable desks are beneficial in the office. According to one study, after a few weeks of standing people reported a 32% improvement to lower back pain. Another study saw a 54% improvement to people who suffer from upper back and neck pain. Both studies show height adjustable desk can dramatically decrease chronic back pain caused by prolonged periods of sitting. 

Standing Can Improve Mood & Productivity

In a 7-week study, people have reported a significant reduction in fatigue levels and improved mood state in the office. Furthermore, once returning to their original desk, overall moods reverted to its original level. Height adjustable desk is seen to improve psychological well-being with no impact on employee work rate.

Take your Stand

It is recommended to split your sitting and stand time at an even amount between them. Height adjustable desks are an important lifestyle change and reducing sedentary time can improve physical, metabolic and mental health.

 

References

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25168375

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23057991

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23057991